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Top Five US Metros for Life Sciences In 2022

Life sciences

TOP FIVE US METROS FOR LIFE SCIENCES IN 2022

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Growth in the life sciences sector has driven demand in recent years for both commercial real estate space and labor to accommodate this specialized sector. A new study by commercial real estate platform CommercialCafe set out to identify the best metros for life science companies in 2022 and assessed more than 40 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) in terms of regional talent pool and workforce; accessibility of local office markets; the degree of availability of existing dedicated property; as well as the state of the local pipeline aiming to expand local life sciences capacity.

Boston took the number one spot on the list, with San Francisco in second place, then San Diego third, New York fourth, and Washington, D.C., rounding out the top five.

A longtime “flagship market” for life sciences, the Boston metropolitan area remains a leader in the sector. The MSA stood out for several key indices scored in the ranking: Boston boasts the largest labor pool among the metros analyzed, as well as the largest life sciences real estate market — nearly 25 million square feet of existing dedicated property, of which just under 14 million square feet was LEED-certified space. What’s more, with an additional 23.8 million square feet of new life sciences developments in the pipeline — under construction, as well as in the planned and prospective stages — Boston seems firmly placed at number one for the foreseeable future.

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City Council Members Meet with NAIOP Charlotte for LWAL

Last week, NAIOP members met with City Council Candidates Dimple Ajmera and Marjorie Molina to discuss important issues impacting Charlotte’s CRE industry.

LWAL two

The Lunch with a Leader series provides NAIOP Charlotte members an exclusive opportunity to meet and interact with key leaders in our community. Look for upcoming NAIOP Charlotte fall events here.

LWAL one

UDO: Planning Committee to Review and Recommend

Compiled from REBIC, staff reports

REBIC’s Rob Nanfelt reported Tuesday that the City’s Planning Committee is taking up the matter of the proposed Unified Development Ordinance. Next month, committee members will take any additional recommendations before the third/final draft.

Last week, the Charlotte City Council received comments from the community during a public hearing on the proposed UDO. Click here to view the resolution. The entire hearing is available to view here – beginning approximately at the 2:51:30 mark.   

Next is a review and recommendation from the City’s Planning Committee scheduled to begin Tuesday, July 19, at 5 p.m. Those interested can view it on the City’s Planning Department YouTube Channel. The complete agenda and meeting packet is available here.

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Vacant Storefronts Can be Repurposed into Retail Incubators

Retail incubator

Vacant Storefronts Can be Repurposed into Retail Incubators

They can provide an immediate boost in shopping districts and grow future businesses into long-term tenants.

  • Written by Ilana Preuss, Development Magazine

The COVID-19 pandemic has left America’s retail districts pockmarked with empty storefronts, but there is a creative solution. These vacant spaces, which often can be purchased or rented at reduced prices, are prime targets for conversion into retail incubators.

Retail incubators, like business incubators, nurture new or small-scale entrepreneurs during the startup phase. They mitigate some of the challenges of opening a business by providing financial and technical assistance, such as the basics of marketing and business plans. Tenants typically share space, ideas and operating expenses in locations that they could not otherwise afford. Many spaces have flexible or temporary lease terms. Some allow for small-scale manufacturing and hold community events, such as product demonstrations, fashion shows and art openings.

In addition to real estate, retail incubators provide fledgling businesses with valuable resources such as technical and financial assistance.  

According to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, new business applications in the United States set an all-time record of 5.1 million in 2021. At the same time, the pandemic has led to consolidation of space and locations by major retail brands, which reduced the prospect of attracting businesses. The challenge for small businesses is they can’t immediately fill the footprints of major store closings. However, they can make temporary use of retail space to establish their businesses, and occupying formerly abandoned stores can help energize struggling downtowns.

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2040 Planning Academy Starting Tuesday, June 21

2040 Planning Academy

2040 Planning Academy Starting Tuesday, June 21

Do you have questions about all the development you see in CLT? Do you want to know more about how CLT plans for its future? Are you interested in influencing the future of your neighborhood?

The 2040 Planning Academy, formerly the Community Planning Academy, is a free 5-class program aimed at helping residents better understand the role planning plays in building communities. Through group discussions, presentations, and interactive activities, participants will learn when and how they can be involved in planning processes and help influence the future of their community.

The application window is open starting today, Tuesday, June 21, 2022, and will close on Sunday, July 17, 2022, at midnight.

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A 1980s-Era Office Park is Reborn as Multifamily Housing

 

originally published by Mark Rivers for NAIOP National

Buildings

The future was bleak for Park Center, a 566,000-square-foot, three-building Class B- office park in Alexandria, Virginia, when it came to market in 2016. The property consisted of two 14-story office towers and one four-story building, half of which was occupied by a full-service fitness center. 

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Six Ways to Reduce Risk on Office Construction Projects

 

originally published by MICHAEL CASOLO for NAIOP National with permission to repost.

Construction Pic

The right design may be the key to achieving the flexible, experiential physical workplace of the future – but it’s only half the battle. Even the most flawless blueprint requires seamless construction delivery to unlock its maximum potential.

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Charlotte UDO & Policy Maps Update

 

originally published by REBIC with permission to repost. 

2040 Policy Map Pic

New schedule for Policy Map announced today:

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News from Around the Region

 

originally published by REBIC for Two for Tuesday with permission to repost.

Davidson

Bridge

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Charlotte Fire Department Update

 

originally posted by REBIC for Two for Tuesday with permission to repost

Charlotte Fire Department Pic

Starting 15 February 2022, Land Development application permits submitted will have to comply with NCIFC 507.1 and 507.5.1. for hydrant spacing. Hydrant spacing to sprinkler system FDC, (both NFPA 13 and 13R) will have to be within 200’ of truck travel to the respected fire hydrant.

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Unique Adaptive Reuse Projects

 

originally published by BRIELLE SCOTT for NAIOP National with permission to repot. 

Parkandford Apartments

Adaptive reuse projects can often be a high-risk, high-reward proposition, as aging or obsolete assets bring their own set of unique challenges for developers hoping to revitalize or reposition a property for new uses.

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Improving the Building Permit Process

 

originally published by VALERIE MAISLIN for NAIOP National with permission to repost.

Development Approval

Building on the NAIOP Research Foundation’s recent study, The Development Approvals Index: A New Tool to Evaluate Local Approvals Processes, several NAIOP chapters and George Mason University have collected data on development approvals across the United States and Canada.  

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Two for Tuesday - Redistricting Updates

 

originally published by REBIC with permission to repost on CRCBR.

Two for Tuesday - REBIC


 

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Buildings account for 39% of global greenhouse emissions — that could be an opportunity for investors

Originally written by Karen Gilchrist on September 17th, 2021 for CNBC.

Investing in sustainable buildings could offer a real solution to reducing emissions in one of the world’s most polluting sectors, said Taronga Ventures, an investment firm focused on sustainable innovation and tech.

Buildings currently represent 39% of global greenhouse emissions, according to U.N. data. Almost one-third (28%) of the global total is the result of running buildings — referred to as operational emissions, while 11% comes from building materials and construction.

Read the full article here!

A New Life for an Old Department Store

Originally published by Brent Carroll for NAIOP's Spring 2021 Issue.

An adaptive reuse project revitalizes an iconic retail tower in Portland, Oregon.

For residents of a certain age in Portland, Oregon, the phrase “meet me under the clock” meant the clock on the main floor of the Meier & Frank department store, which first opened nearly 150 years ago. The 16-story terracotta landmark building at 555 Southwest Morrison Street encompasses an entire city block near Pioneer Courthouse Square, widely known as “Portland’s living room.”

In November 2016, a new era for the Meier & Frank Building began when KBS purchased the asset for $54 million in a joint venture with private development firm Sterling Bay with the intent of repositioning the property. Converting part of a beloved former department store into a fully leased Class A mixed-use space while preserving the historical integrity of the original property required hard work as well as some creative problem-solving. 

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Charlotte Sign & Tree Ordinance Updates Approved

Posted on October 29, 2019

On October 21 Charlotte City Council voted to approve updates to the sign and tree ordinances. Most importantly, the updated tree ordinance allows for more flexibility for developers on urban sites in the City, which is less than 5% of Charlotte’s total developable land.

REBIC sent a letter to the Council urging their support, and we would like to thank those who voted in the affirmative: Mayor Pro Tem Julie Eiselt, Councilman Braxton Winston, Councilman James Mitchell, Councilman Larken Egleston, Councilman Greg Phipps, Councilwoman LaWana Mayfield, Councilman Justin Harlow, Councilman Tariq Bokhari and Councilman Ed Driggs. We would also like to thank Mayor Vi Lyles for her leadership and ability to support council through contentious discussions in a judicious manner.

Thank you to our members who personally reached out to Council Members as well!

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Huntersville Assumed Land Development Review & Permitting July 1

Posted on July 15, 2019

Beginning July 1, the Town of Huntersville is assuming review of all land development review and permitting, bringing in-house a variety of services previously provided by Mecklenburg County.

But because the Town failed to request delegated authority for Erosion & Sedimentation Control from the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), all E&S review and inspections for projects in Huntersville will continue to be provided by Mecklenburg County LUESA until at least mid-August.

All development plans previously submitted to LUESA will continue to be reviewed by the County, which will also conduct inspections on those projects. Any new development projects submitting from today forward will go through the Town’s Engineering & Public Works Department. Huntersville last month adopted a new fee schedule that is similar to the 2018 LUESA fees for land development plan review, bond maintenance and other related services.

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Cabarrus County Proposes Massive Zoning Fee Increases

Posted on June 10, 2019

On Monday, June 3, 2019, proposed planning and zoning fee changes were presented to the Cabarrus County Board of Commissioners, based on a recent study evaluating the potential to move to a full cost-recovery model. Along with changes in the cost of permit fees, staff is proposing changing new construction permits to a single permit (blanket permits).Cabarrus County Seal

On Wednesday, June 19, Cabarrus County Planning staff is inviting builders to come to an open session from 1-3 p.m. in the Multi-Purpose Room at the Cabarrus County Governmental Center.  During this session staff will discuss why these fees are being proposed, give examples of how fees are charged now, and what the fees would be if adopted as proposed.  Staff will be able to answer any questions and hear any feedback that you have.

Cabarrus County Development Fee Meeting

Wednesday, June 19

1:00 PM to 3:00 PM

Cabarrus County Government Resource Center – Multipurpose Room

65 Church Street S.

Concord, NC 28025

*It is very important that we have a strong showing at this meeting with staff*

 

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Huntersville Adopts Land Development Fee Schedule

Posted June 6, 2019

As it prepares to take over development plan review from Mecklenburg County on July 1st, the Town of Huntersville has amended its fee schedule to include the current (FY 2018) LUESA fees for land development plan review, bond maintenance and other related services. The fees are substantially lower than those proposed by Mecklenburg County in FY 2019 and 2020, which will increase more than 200% over a two-year period.

The main services the Town will take over from LUESA include development plan review; zoning, development and erosion control inspections; and bond administration. Five new positions have been created to provide these services, and the Town expects to have them in place within the next two months. The positions include a Street Inspector, an Erosion Control Inspector, a Bond Administrator, a Stormwater Plan Review and a Zoning Inspector.

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Mecklenburg County Property Revaluations Online Now

Posted on January 28, 2019.

Originally posted by REBIC.

The 2019 Mecklenburg County Property Revaluation is complete, and property valuations are now online at the Assessor’s website.  Look for your Notice of 2019 Real Estate Assessed Value in your mailbox in late January 2019, and remember that this Notice is NOT a bill. Your property tax bill will be determined by the tax rates adopted by Mecklenburg County and the City of Charlotte later this year (probably around July).

You can also use the tools on the County website to file an informal appeal if you think your property has been improperly valued. If you disagree with the results of your Informal Review Request, you have a right to file a Formal Appeal to the Board of Equalization and Review. You may request an appeal any time prior to the adjournment of the Board of Equalization and Review or within 30 days of your Notice of 2019 Assessed Value. All requests for appeal must be made in writing and on the proper form.

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